News Category

Texas prison chief wants cell phone jammer test

Views : 125
Update time : 2008-03-10 17:49:00

Texas prison chief wants cell phone jammer test

HOUSTON — The head of the Texas prison system wants to see if cell phone jamming equipment can be effective in preventing another inmate from escaping.
Brad Livingston, executive director of the Texas Department of Criminal Justice, said Tuesday he's asking his agency arrange a demonstration at the Stiles Unit in Beaumont of technology designed to block or manage cell phones.
Such a test would be a first for the Texas prison system, which has been plagued by illegal cell phone use despite shakedowns that have resulted in seizure of scores of contraband phones from the state's more than 100 prisons.
"Clearly the issue of cell phone smuggling requires further action," Livingston said. "In addition to security measures, action to make cell phones ineffective within the correctional environment must be part of the solution."
Investigators have determined 27-year-old convict David Puckett had a cell phone that may have aided him when he escaped from the Stiles Unit last week. Puckett was captured Monday in Omaha, Neb., five days after he climbed a fence at the Stiles Unit and fled.
Livingston said the escape represents a security failure on the part of his department, and that he accepts responsibility for it.
"Although we have taken numerous actions to enhance security and combat the introduction of contraband within our correctional institutions, it is obvious these measures did not prevent offender Puckett from obtaining a cell phone which may have facilitated his escape."
He said a video surveillance system upgrade at the Stiles Unit was under way, "but we cannot rely upon its completion alone to enhance security at the facility."
"No single action may be sufficient, but an effective plan of action involves a combination of measures, to include rendering cell phones useless to offenders," Livingston said.
Federal marshals captured Puckett Monday night at a female friend's apartment in Omaha. He jumped out of a second-story window to evade them but was nabbed. Puckett's last sighting was in the Texas Medical Center in Houston, shortly after he escaped in a stolen pickup truck. He apparently was seeking treatment for wounds suffered when he climbed a fence topped with razor wire but hustled out of a hospital when he apparently saw security officers in his vicinity.
Omaha is 800 miles north of Houston.
Puckett had been locked up since February 2002 when he began serving a 30-year sentence for aggravated assault of a police officer in Lavaca County, about midway between Houston and Corpus Christi.
Livingston said in the wake of the escape, the Stiles Unit, opened in 1993 and with a capacity of nearly 2,900 inmates, has been placed on lockdown while teams of officers using dogs trained to detect phones and drugs conduct a comprehensive search. He also has ordered mobile cell phone detection equipment deployed to the prison. A review by department officials will "identify issues and provide recommendations that may be applicable to both the Stiles facility and units system-wide," Livingston said.
Inmate use of contraband cell phones, a challenge for prison administrators throughout the country, was highlighted in Texas in October 2008 when a death row inmate used a smuggled phone to call and threaten a Texas state senator. Those calls resulted in an unprecedented sweep of all Texas prisons, uncovering hundreds of contraband items, but the problem has persisted.